Richard Morgan is a maker (luthier) from Australia and a member of theMandolinTuner community. From the moment that Richard joined theMandolinTuner we started exchanging e-mails and I was very happy to read about his work, especially as Richard mandolins (and mandolas, mandocellos, etc.) are truly innovative, featuring a unique sound-board design and lots of other innovations as well.

Soon, I start thinking of Richard as a friend of mine and I shared with him my vision of creating a section for luthiers within theMandolinTuner, something I believe would be very interesting for theMandolinTuner community. I am happy to say that Richard liked my idea and what you read now is the first article in a series of articles we have planned as the first step towards realising this vision. I named  this article series “A Luthier Journey”.

So, enjoy Richard describing his journey as an instrument maker.

– Chris Rizos 

Introduction

All makers or luthiers have a love of the instruments that they build. Although each maker has a unique journey and therefore a unique style of instrument there seems to be a common thread for the need of deep understanding.
Being a maker and member of the Mandolintuner Chris has asked me to share my beliefs and experiences on design and materials. I am more than happy to do this and I hope it will be of some use.

1. The Patient Dies

The road I travelled to become a maker of instruments in the mandolin family started nearly 50 years back when my sister kindly gave me her classical guitar. I played the same few things over and over and probably drove anyone within earshot completely mad.

Strange as it may sound 20 years later it turns out that my ability to play the same few things is useful support to singers and melody players. After playing rhythm guitar in a Celtic group for about 10 years I finally became bored. In an attempt to resolve this problem I tried to learn melody. I discovered I was too slow and if I could keep up the pace I was not adding to the music. Fortunately there was one remaining avenue and that is counter melody.

Counter melody for me meant learning the major and minor scales in the main keys which turned out to be mainly D G A C F and Bb. Of course there are many other modes apart from minor and major. I find counter melody lots of fun and it can nearly always adds ” colour ” to music.

richard morgan

The problem with playing melody or counter melody on an acoustic guitar like a dreadnaught is that it is too quiet and can only work effectively with a small number of players before being drowned out. I can remember one occasion not being able to hear my own instrument when attempting to join in with a group of piano accordionists. To get more acoustic power was the initial motivating force behind my decision to build my own instrument. Since my skills lay in the area of fibre glass and carbon fibre my first instrument was a composite of glass carbon fibre and timber. It was constructed by simply taking measurements from an existing instrument.

The resultant instrument was no where nearly as good as I believed it to be at the time. I played it with friends for a couple of months and then brimming with confidence took it to a very successful maker for appraisal. I can clearly remember that meeting 20 years back as if were yesterday.

After looking over and listening to my instrument carefully for a minute or so Brian looked at me squarely and uttered one word. . .” Why “. . . .” Why are you building instruments?” My response was that is was something that I had to do. He went on. . . “This instrument is like a doctor who has performed a brilliant operation but the patient dies.” He then asked if I knew the meaning of intonation which he then kindly described in detail for me. He also pointed out the need for accuracy in a number of other areas. When looking at some of his finished instruments the attention to detail was astonishing. It was a truly eye opening experience. Probably the most useful thing he told me was that less than one in 20 makers are successful at it becoming their full time source of income. Initially this one piece of information bothered me but it ultimately was the catalyst that gave me the freedom to chose my own path of discovery in the art and science of luthiery.

Hopefully the following articles will shed some light on some of the successes, failures and odd synchronicities I have experienced over the last 20 years.

Regards Richard Morgan

 

About the Luthiers Journey article series

Richard Morgan is a maker (luthier) from Australia and a member of theMandolinTuner community. From the moment that Richard joined theMandolinTuner we started exchanging e-mails and I was very happy to read about his work, especially as Richard mandolins (and mandolas, mandocellos, etc.) are truly innovative, featuring a unique sound-board design and lots of other innovations as well.

Soon, I start thinking of Richard as a friend of mine and I shared with him my vision of creating a section for luthiers within theMandolinTuner, something I believe would be very interesting for theMandolinTuner community. I am happy to say that Richard liked my idea and what you read now is a series of articles we have planned as the first step towards realizing this vision. I named  this article series “A Luthiers Journey”.

So, enjoy Richard describing his journey as an instrument maker.

– Chris Rizos 

 

All Luthiers Journey Articles by Richard Morgan

  • Richard Morgan Floating Soundboard

Thank god for luggage handlers

Watching the plane next to ours being loaded It became clear how and why musical instruments often turn up damaged. The acoustic bass guitar which I created in 2009 did not survive the flight [...]

  • Radiant Instrument Necks

Radiant Instrument Necks and Neck Joins

Christos: It's been a while since I published the last post by Richard, so I was very happy to receive this article, which provides insight in the importance of radiant instrument necks for the produced [...]

  • Luthier's Journey #10

Too Much Coffee

If I had to choose listening to an average instrument played by a master or vice versa I would choose the former. Of course a masterful musician may simply choose not to play a [...]

  • Mandolin Making Skills by Richard Morgan

A good haircut

I can remember as a child the pleasure of my monthly haircut. My mum would drop me off at the hairdresser and go shopping. I would often fall asleep as it was a very [...]

Hair Loss

The open C string on a cello would have to be my favorite sound. Its grinding organic growl makes what is left of my hair stand on end. If I were the owner of [...]

  • Old Violin

A Rough Diamond

Anyone who visits my home country, Australia, will be astonished by the huge distances between the towns and cities. Australia does have a relatively low population. For example, the island state where I live [...]

  • Richard Morgan

Synchronicity

Probably the most enjoyable part of my journey as a luthier has been of recent years. It all started with attempts at building timber resonator cones. I was looking for warmer tone. The "National" [...]

  • Mandolins from Richard Morgan

Windy Strings

As a maker I have found discussions with other makers extremely useful. The exchange of ideas, philosophies and techniques is a big part of keeping the learning curve steep. Also feedback from players is [...]

Spruce

In team sports like soccer there are individuals who "make" the play and others who "read" the play. A good balance of each is needed. In my opinion the same sort of balance is [...]

  • Richard Morgan Mandola honey

Pure Honey

This is second article of the Luthiers Journey series, titled Pure Honey. In this article, Richard Morgan begins with the hazards and suggested basic precautions in the art of  luthiery, and then describes with a [...]

  • Richard Morgan mandola copy

The Patient Dies

Richard Morgan is a maker (luthier) from Australia and a member of theMandolinTuner community. From the moment that Richard joined theMandolinTuner we started exchanging e-mails and I was very happy to read about his [...]

Richard Morgan

My name is Richard and I am an Australian designer and maker of mandolins. I live with my partner in a small coastal town in Tasmania and work at home. The mandolin family of instruments produce beautiful [...]

 

Instruments by Richard Morgan

Instruments by Richard Morgan are featured at www.extraordinaryinstruments.com

Mandolinist Christos Rizos Extraordinary Instruments